Pimsleur Japanese I-10

Kanjis: 1st grade + JLPT N5; Additional kanjis for lessons 9-16:

はん – meal ひる – noon 明日 あした – tomorrow
ばん – evening つぎ – next 一寸 ちょっと – a little

Conversation transcript


Instructions
listen to the following conversation, please
tsugi no kaiwa wo kiite kudasai
つぎの かいわを きいて ください。
次の会話を聞いて下さい。


listen again, please
mou ichido kiite kudasai
もう いちど きいて ください。
もういちど聞いて下さい。



English
1: Man; 2: Ms. Sato

1: Ms. Sato.
    Won’t you eat lunch with me?
2: Yeah. But at what time? one o’clock?
1: No. later.
2: Ah, I got it. Two o’clock?
1: Yeah. At two o’clock.
2: Yes. I got it.


romaji
1: otoko no hito; 2: satou

1: satou san.
    watashi to hiru-gohan wo tabe-masen ka?
2: ee. demo, nan-ji ni?ichi-ji?
1: iie. ato de.
2: aa, wakari-mashita. ni-ji?
1: ee. ni-ji ni.
2: hai. wakari-mashita.



kana
1: おとこの ひと; 2: さとう

1: さとうさん.
    わたしと ひるごはんを たべませんか
2: ええ。でも、なんじに?いちじ?
1: いいえ。あとで。
2: ああ、わかりました。にじ?
1: ええ。にじに。
2: はい。わかりました。


kanji
1: 男の人; 2: さとう

1: さとうさん.
    私と昼ご飯を食べませんか。
2: ええ。でも、何時に?一時?
1: いいえ。後で。
2: ああ、分かりました。二時?
1: ええ。二時に。
2: はい。分かりました。


Vocabulary


English
next, following

meeting, assembly
talk; speech
conversation

again, another
once, one time
once more, again

three
four
five

a little bit

to listen
masu (formal)
dict (casual)
-te (imperative)

to kindly do
masu (formal)
dict (casual)
-te (imperative)


romaji
tsugi

kai
wa
kaiwa

mou
ichido
mou ichido

san
yon
go

chotto

 
kiki-masu
kiku
kiite

 
kudasai-masu
kudasaru
kudasai


kana
つぎ

かい

かいわ

もう
いちど
もういちど

さん
よん

ちょっと

 
ききます
きく
きいて

 
くださいます
くださる
ください


kanji
 



会話

 
 
 



一寸

 
聞きます
聞く
聞いて

 
下さいます
下さる
下さい


  • The name of 4 is ‘yon’ (よん) but, to facilitate the pronunciation when combined with certain sounds, it is sometimes shortened to ‘yo’ (よ). Thus, 4:00 is ‘yo-ji’ (よじ), not ‘yon-ji’.

Sample sentences

However, won’t you join me later for lunch?


formal
demo, ato de watashi to hiru-gohan wo tabe-masen ka?

でも、あとで わたしと ひるごはんを たべませんか。

でも、後で私と昼ご飯を食べませんか。

casual
demo, ato de boku to hiru-gohan wo tabe-nai?

でも、あとで ぼくと ひるごはんを たべない?

でも、後で僕と昼ご飯を食べない?



Comments

The following comments explain some of the grammar in more detail.

Verbs

-tai form – たい

The -tai form plays the same role as the English auxiliary verb “want”; however, it only applies to what we want or do not want, not to what other people want or do not want.


non-past


positive
-tai (desu)


negative
-taku [ari-masen/nai (desu)]


We are converting the verb into an i-adjective and then conjugating it as an i-adjective, using ‘desu’ as a decorator only. For example:


I want to eat something
formal
casual

I don’t want to eat
most formal
formal
casual


nani-ka tabe-tai desu
nanka tabe-tai

 
tabe-taku ari-masen
tabe-taku nai desu
tabe-taku nai



Since the verb-tai is an i-adjective, then the direct object is marked with ‘ga’ instead of ‘wo’:


i-adjectives
I want sushi.
I don’t want sake.

-tai verbs
I want to eat sushi.
I don’t want to drink sake.


 
sushi ga hoshi-i desu.
o-sake ga hoshi-ku ari-masen.

 
sushi ga tabe-tai desu.
o-sake ga nomi-taku ari-masen.


-te from – て

The -te form is an imperative, a gentle request, e.g., “please, eat”.

The narrator of the recording introduces the conversation of Lesson 10 with:


listen to the following conversation, please.


tsugi no kaiwa wo kiite, kudasai.


Here the role of the -te form as an imperative is clear: “listen, please”.

However, the -te form has a second role. Although our translation above does not show it, the Japanese sentence has two verbs in imperative: ‘kiite’ is the imperative of ‘kiku’ (to listen), and ‘kudasai’ is the imperative of ‘kudasaru’ (to kindly do for one). Hence, a translation closer to the Japanese grammar would be:


listen to the following conversation, kindly do that for me


tsugi no kaiwa wo kiite, kudasai


This is not one sentence but two complete sentences, each one with its own verb, each one a gentle request.

What happens is that in Japanese we can connect sentences as long as the verb of each sentence is in the imperative, and then the tense of all of the verbs is set to the tense of the last verb. For example,


I drink, eat, listen, and speak
I drank, ate, listened, and spoke


nonde, tabete, kiite, hanashi-masu
nonde, tabete, kiite, hanashi-mashita


or


I eat sushi and drink sake
I ate sushi and drank sake


sushi wo tabete, o-sake wo nomi-masu.
sushi wo tabete, o-sake wo nomi-mashita.


This imperative form is called the -te form because -te is the most common suffix of the imperative, e.g., tabete (from ‘taberu’). However, the -te form of other verbs have different suffixes, e.g., kiite (from ‘kiku’), or nonde (from ‘nomu’).

Prefixes and suffixes

ji – じ,時

ji is the counter for hours. Unlike the counter for long thin things – hon – from lesson 8, ji does not change with different numbers, i.e. it is always ‘ji’. However, the numbers change:

  • ‘4 hours’ is not ‘yon-ji’ but ‘yo-ji’
  • ‘7 hours’ is not ‘nana-ji’ but ‘shichi-ji’, and
  • ‘9 hours’ is not ‘kyu-ji’ but ‘ku-ji’

Depending on the context, we may be referring to hours on the clock, or to time intervals measured in hours:

English 1 English 2 romaji kana kanji
1 hour 1:00 o'clock ichi-ji いちじ 一時
2 hours 2:00 o'clock ni-ji にじ 二時
3 hours 3:00 o'clock san-ji さじ 三時
4 hours 4:00 o'clock yo-ji よじ 四時
5 hours 5:00 o'clock go-ji ごじ 五時
6 hours 6:00 o'clock roku-ji ろくじ 六時
7 hours 7:00 o'clock shichi-ji しちじ 七時
8 hours 8:00 o'clock hachi-ji はちじ 八時
9 hours 9:00 o'clock ku-ji くじ 九時
10 hours 10:00 o'clock juu-ji じゅうじ 十時
11 hours 11:00 o'clock juu-ichi-ji じゅういちじ 十一時
12 hours 12:00 o'clock juu-ni-ji じゅうにじ 十二時
how many hours? what time? nan-ji なんじ 何時

Adverbs

chotto – ちょっと, 一寸

‘chotto’ means ‘a little bit’. This is used literally, simply meaning ‘a little bit’:


chotto matte, kudasai.


wait a little bit, please.


or figuratively, as ‘a little bit (difficult)’, which is a polite way to say ‘no’:


ima wa chotto…


Now? (it is) a little bit… (difficult)


Expressions

kudasai – ください

kudasai can be written in kanji as 下さい, but it is usually written in hiragana: ください. kudasai has two meanings, both imperatives:


please, give me
please, give me money
please, give me 10 dollars

please, do (for me)
please, do me the favor of waiting a little
please, do me the favor of listening


 
o-kane wo kudasai
juu doru kudasai

 
chotto matte kudasai
kiite, kudasai