Pimsleur Japanese I-3

Kanjis: 1st grade + JLPT N5; Additional kanjis for lessons 1-8:

わたし – I/me きみ – you 所・処 ところ – place
ぼく – I/me さけ – sake 欲しい ほしい – wanted

Conversation transcript

Instructions
Listen to this conversation


English
1: man; 2: woman

1: Good morning.
2: Good morning.
1: Good weather, right?
2: Ah, you understand Japanese, right?
1: Yes. A little.
    However, I am not skilled (at it) yet.
2: Are you American?
1: Yes.
2: However, you understand Japanese well!


romaji
1: otoko no hito; 2: onna no hito

1: o-hayou gozai-masu.
2: o-hayou gozai-masu.
1: i-i o-tenki desu ne?
2: aa, nihon-go ga wakari-masu ne?
1: hai. sukoshi.
    demo, mada jouzu ja ari-masen.
2: anata wa amerika-jin desu ka?
1: hai.
2: demo, nihon-go ga yoku wakari-masu ne!



kana
1: おとこの ひと; 2: おんなの ひと

1: おはよう ございます。
2: おはよう ございます。
1: いい おてんき ですね。
2: ああ、にほんごが わかりますね。
1: はい。すこし。
    でも、まだ じょうず じゃありません。
2: あなたは アメリカじん ですか。
1: はい。
2: でも、にほんごが よく わかりますね。


kanji
1: 男の人; 2: 女の人

1: お早うございます。
2: お早うございます。
1: いいお天気ですね。
2: ああ、日本語が分かりますね。
1: はい。少し。
    でも、まだ上手じゃありません。
2: あなたはアメリカ人ですか。
1: はい。
2: でも、日本語がよく分かりますね。


Vocabulary


English
now, the current
day
good afternoon

very, quite
well, skillfully

bad, disagreeable
energetic


romaji
kon
nichi
kon-nichi-wa

doumo
yoku

iya-na
genki-na


kana
こん
にち
こんにちは

どうも
よく

いやな
げんきな


kanji


今日は

 
 

 
げん気


  • Words ending in -i and -na are i-adjectives and na-adjectives, respectibly.

Sample sentences

Bad weather, right?


formal
iya-na o-tenki desu ne?

いやな おてんき ですね。

いやなお天気ですね。

casual
iya-na o-tenki da na?

いやな おてんき だな。

いやなお天気だな。



Comments

The following comments explain some of the grammar in more detail.

Expressions

konnichiwa – こんにちは, 今日は

  • ‘kon’ means ‘this’, or ‘the current’. It’s kanji is 今, which means ‘now’
  • ‘nichi’ means ‘day’; it uses the same kanji as Sun, i.e., 日
  • ‘wa’ is the particle は, that we translate as a question mark ’?’

Hence, ‘kon-nichi-wa’ means ‘(how are you) this day?’, i.e., ‘hello’, or ‘good afternoon’.

Adverbs

yoku – よく

nicely; properly; well; skillfully

In the recording it is not clear when to use ‘yoku’ and when to use ‘jouzu’. After all, ‘yoku’ means ‘skillfully’ or ‘well’, while ‘jouzu’ means ‘skilled’.

‘jouzu’ is a na-adjective, so to use it alone it has to be followed with either ‘desu/da’ or ‘[dewa/ja][ari-masen/nai]’:


You? You are good (at it).
You? You are not good (at it).


anata wa jouzu desu.
anata wa jouzu ja ari-masen.


‘yoku’ is an adverb so it modifies a verb, in this case, the verb ‘wakari-masu’ (to understand):


You? Japanese! You understand it well.
You? Japanese! You don’t understand it well.


anata wa nihon-go ga yoku wakari-masu.
anata wa nihon-go ga yoku wakari-masen.


‘yoku’ works like ‘sukoshi’, which is also an adverb:


You understand well.
You don’t understand well.

You understand a little.
You don’t understand a little.


yoku wakari-masu.
yoku wakari-masen.

sukoshi wakari-masu.
sukoshi wakari-masen.


doumo – どうも

It’s a placeholder word meaning ‘very’ or ‘quite’ that adapts to many situations. ‘doumo’ emphasizes a feeling. The feeling can be

  • explicit, i.e., doumo arigatou (very grateful), or
  • implicit, i.e., we say ‘doumo’ and the context says what it is that we are ‘doumo’ about

For example, we can say just ‘doumo’ to mean any of the following:


situation
hello – in person and on the phone
goodbye
please
thank you
you’re welcome
sorry


meaning of ‘doumo’
very happy to talk to you
wishing you a very good trip
very humbly requesting
very grateful
very happy to have been useful
very sorry


mada – まだ

Indicates that there has not been any change in a state, for either positive or negative states:

positive state – still:


romaji
mada jouzu desu.
mada genki desu.


English
I’m still skilled
I’m still healthy


meaning
I was skilled before, and I’m skilled now
I was healthy before, and I’m healthy now


negative state – not yet:


romaji
mada jouzu ja nai
mada genki ja nai


English
I’m not skilled yet
I’m not healthy yet


meaning
I wasn’t skilled before & I’m not skilled now
I wasn’t healthy before & I’m not healthy now



‘ja nai’ is the casual version of ‘ja ari-masen’.

Conjunctions

demo – でも

‘demo’ means ‘but’, but it has to be used at the beginning of a sentence, so a better translation is ‘Nevertheless,’ or ‘However,’. For example:


I understand English.
However, I don’t understand Japanese.


ei-go ga wakari-masu.
demo,
nihon-go ga wakari-masen.